• NGC 3190
  • The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared One of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The above image, digitally sharpened, shows the infrared glow, recently recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope
  • The cloud formations were snapped in the skies over Chile's Torres Del Paine National Park
  • Hubble Space Telescope
  • A view of Earth from The Moon taken by NASA.
  • By combining computer simulations with multi-band observations, two new studies examine how luminosity, star formation, dust heating, and other effects evolve during a galaxy collision. The interacting galaxies Messier 51A and B as seen in the infrared. Credit: NASA; L. Lanz
  • An Incredible View of Saturn that Could Only Be Seen by a Visiting Spacecraft
  • Our solar system to scale.
  • The Earth at Night
  • Black Hole
  • Quasar
  • The Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero.