• Canadian potter Abby Ozaltug creates charming clay planters that give an extra bit of personality to domestic leafy greens. Tousled ivy, spiky cacti, and multi-strand succulents become the unique verdant hairstyles of rotund planters.
  • Rami Kim began making visual artwork as a stop-motion animator, crafting small head sculptures for her films’ puppets. These objects became the inspiration for her works in clay, eventually morphing into the face pots and mugs she creates today. Kim’s tiny three-dimensional faces range from monochrome noses and mouths to painted visages complete with lipstick-adorned mouths and perfectly perched eyebrows.
  • Sculptor Calvin Ma channels his experience of social anxiety into imaginative ceramic sculptures that fuse human characters with birds. The avian elements act as suits of armor, protecting the person from the outside world, and reflect Ma’s personality in fight or flight situations. Carefully articulated feathers cover the surface of each sculpture, from the mask-like bird headdresses to the arms and torso of the humanoid figure.
  • London-based artist Claire Partington creates figurative ceramic vessels steeped in power dynamics and status. Her works often feature removable head stoppers that feature humans and animals, which brings a range and versatility to each glazed character. Her inspiration for the elegant figures comes mostly from European applied art and design styles from the 17th-century onward, yet the pieces blend elements from various centuries and genres.
  • Ceramic artist Martha Pachón Rodríguez‘s sculptural vessels juxtapose an extremely clean, refined construction with sharp repeated shapes and jarring color combinations. Using a mix of uncolored and pigmented porcelain, Rodríguez layers thin triangles or spikes that resemble quills or teeth, to frame gaping holes in her rounded vessels.
  • Ceramic artist Kaori Kurihara’s textured ceramics reference familiar botanicals like durian, cauliflower, and bananas, while maintaining an otherworldly element of surprise. The artist adds organic details like articulated fronds and streaked or dimpled skin by hand, while working in part from her imagination.
  • While many designers focus on enhancing the cuteness of small air plants, ceramic artist Gregory Knopp highlights the otherworldly qualities of these popular plants. His hand-built clay vessels feature gaping mouth-like holes surrounded by curling claws or winding appendages that draw attention to the spindly air plants.
  • Anonymous Figures Struggle Against Nature in Porcelain Sculptures by Claudia Fontes
  • A Menagerie of Ceramic Beasts and Curiosities at Messums Wiltshire’s ‘Material Earth II’
  • The Dripping and Undulating Ceramic Sculptures of Toru Kurokawa
  • The Dripping and Undulating Ceramic Sculptures of Toru Kurokawa
  • New Porcelain Vessels Densely Layered in Leaf Sprigs and Other Botanical Forms by Hitomi Hosono
  • Ceramic Origami Plates and Dishware by Angelina Erhorn
  • Kernel Panic: New Binary Ceramics Punctuated with Typewriter Keys by Laura C. Hewitt
  • Aspen Trees Grow on Delicate Ceramic Vessels by Heesoo Lee
  • Colorful Crystal Explosions on Ceramic Vessels by Collin Lynch
  • Ornate Ceramic Vessels Encased in Porcelain Flowers by Artist Vanessa Hogge
  • Handmade Ceramic Blooms and Succulents by Owen Mann
  • Rainbow Drip Vessels by Brian Giniewski Ceramics
  • Fluid Porcelain Bowls by Aylin Bilgiç Look Like Splashes Frozen in Time
  • New Ceramic Dino Designs by Brett Kern Made to Look Like Inflatable Toys
  • Ultra Satisfying Porcelain Carving Videos by Abe Haruya
  • Ceramic Flower Sculptures and Tiles by Angela Schwer