• Wabi sabi describes a traditional Japanese aesthetic sensibility based on an appreciation of the transient beauty of the natural world. It embodies the melancholic appeal of the impermanence of all things, especially the modest, the rustic, the imperfect, and even the decayed. Wabi sabi represents the passage of time and what remains. written by Donna Watson
  • Tea bowl in style of Korean punch'ong ware, unknown Raku ware workshop  mid 18th - mid 19th century      Edo period     Raku-type earthenware with white slip inlaid under clear, colorless glaze  H: 8.3 W: 12.5 cm   Kyoto, Japan
  • Kintsukuroi or kintsugi is the art of healing broken pottery with lacquer and silver or gold. The philosophy behind this reparation is that something should not be discarded just because it is broken. It is in fact more beautiful for having been broken.
  • b: Kintsukuroi
  • Kintsugi (金継ぎ), meaning “golden joinery,” is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery using gold. It restores functionality to a broken vessel, and not only adds beauty and worth, it turns destruction and damage into the most valuable part of the piece. The scars of the past are not erased  or hidden away, to be ashamed of - they are transformed, immortalized in gold.
  • “When the Japanese mend broken objects, they aggrandize the damage by filling the cracks with gold. They believe that when something’s suffered damage and has a history it becomes more beautiful.” -Babara Bloom
  • 焼〆急須&ぐい呑  安永正臣作
  • Chawan (tea bowls) are used in Japanese tea ceremonies. Akira Satake
  • Tea bowl, unknown Raku ware workshop, 19th century, Japan /// Kintsugi is the Japanese wabi-sabi art form that involves repairing broken pottery with lacquer, and sometimes even with gold. So if you've broken something ceramic that you truly love, despair not - it can be restored, and made even more beautiful.
  • Chawan Wabi Sabi Japanese Style Shigaraki Clay Tea Bowl  Matcha Tea Ceremony Teabowl George Watson
  • Miyamura studio, Vase with green crystalline glaze. Too beautiful for words.
  • Tea bowl in the style of Koetsu, unknown Raku ware workshop  18th century, Tamamizu Ichigen , (Japanese, 1662?-1722) #chawan
  • Seiji Kosai - Tea Ceremony Bowl by Ikai Yuichi
  • Jomon, Japan, 2500 BC.  These will BLOW YOU AWAY in person, they are huge and ancient and ornate.  Amazing.
  • Mutsuo Yanagihara - Chawan
  • M.Wein  Woodfired teapot fired I Tajimi Anagama Japanese Clay.
  • Abstract Sunlit Forest Oribe Ware Collection Japanese Oribe Plate
  • Japanese Pottery
  • Kintsukuroi – (s.) “consertar com ouro“; a arte de consertar cerâmica com ouro e laca e compreender que a peça é mais bela por ter sido quebrada
  • Shiho Kanzaki, japanese pottery
  • Japanese ORIBE CHAWAN TEA BOWL
  • Japanese Pottery
  • Neriage Chawan Japanese Style Hand Formed Nerikomi Tea Bowl - George Watson
  • Rosslare    Rice Bowl    Shino and glass combine with cobalt blue and iron oxide to make a great surface on this cup/bowl. Made from clay pulled from Texas soil and fired to cone 10.
  • Japanese pottery teapot, 1850
  • Japanese Pottery
  • Humble Bunny Design • Japanese Design Aesthetic: Wabi-Sabi
  • Rare Dragon Vase, Antique Japanese pottery - Tokoname
  • Oribe bottle, Morse Collection, Museum of Fine Art
  • Urushi (Japanese lacquer) glazed plate by Nishikawa Satoshi, exhibition now on at Gallery Kaede, Minami Aoyama.
  • Raku ware (楽焼 raku-yaki?) is a type of Japanese pottery that is traditionally used in the Japanese tea ceremony~  Raku means
  • ryota aoki, japan. Like Raku, a form of Japanese pottery, how a baked clay object comes out of an oven is always   a surprise. Imperfect or not, the potter  accepts its clay object the way a mother fully accepts her newborn baby.