• A miniature Iznik pottery ewer and tazza, Turkey, circa 1575 at The ewer with fine elongated neck, decorated in underglaze cobalt blue, green and relief red with black outlines, tulips and hyacinths, the tazza on a small foot with an everted rim, decorated in underglaze cobalt blue, green and relief red with black outlines, stylised floral design in centre, foliate border on rim. poterie
  • Faenza maiolica Inkwelllate 15th century of monumental architectural form with corner supports modelled in the round as the Four Cardinal Virtues of Prudence, Fortitude, Justice and Temperance. Sold by This inkwell is one of the most important existing examples of work by the earliest generation of sculptors in maiolica, well before even the work of Giovanni di Nicola Manzoni del Colle, whose dated pieces run from 1507 to 1516...It belongs to the same era as the Emilian terracotta sculptures of the last decades of the fifteenth century, led by Niccolo dell'Arca and Guido mazzoni. Its four allegorical Virtues recall in their scuptural quality and in their drapery those of the figures of the Compianto dated 1487 in the Metropolitan Museum, New York. figuresculpture
  • Mary Chase Perry Stratton vase in the ca. 1912-1915. Beautiful example of her early research into luster firing. Hear about her glaze innovations and her role as founder of Pewabic Pottery (on this weeks Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast. (Also pictured: Stratton in 1940.)
  • Shrine head, 12th-14th century Yoruba. Nigeria or Benin. Terracotta. This heads tranquil demeanor and introspective gaze express what the Yoruba peoples consider a persons inner power and essential nature. It is a memorial portrait head that comes from the royal city of Ife in eastern Nigeria, a center of economic, religious, and political power between 1100 and 1400. Ife artists made striking heads in bronze and terra-cotta that were either part of complete figures or, like here, freestanding. The almond-shaped eyes seem to be encircled by eyeliner, a practice still believed to have empowering properties among contemporary Yoruba, while the neck is creased as though with fat, a sign of prosperity in Yoruba society. The vertical lines covering the womans face probably reflect the traditional scarification designs used in the Ife kingdom or may represent the veil worn by the royal family. seramic
  • Check out  for more A Staffordshire Pottery Anti-Slavery Mug, circa 1830, printed in black with a slave released from chains, inscribed Wilberfore and Isaiah Chapter 58.6 and with Farmers' Creed and God Speed the Plough, below a puce foliate border, the base with further verse. From Tennants Auctioneers. abolitionistpottery
  • Colima Preclassic Dancer with removable headdressLate Preclassic, ca. 300-100 B.C. The solid figure distinguished by the elaborate and finely modeled ceremonial attire including a dramatic removable alligator headdress with fierce interlocked teeth, the rectangular snout with black and white patterning and tall sweeping crest of plumes supported on the stippled soft helmet,  the figure's head covered in a finely woven cap with large chinstrap, the face with delicate features peering outward, leaning slightly forward with arms lifting the long and weightly rattles, held through a mitt around each hand, further attired in leg disks, loincloth with applied beads, a closefitting basketry yoke high on the waist, the upper arms with tightly spaced beaded bands and remains of similar tiny ornaments crisscrossing the chest and back; together with a small head vessel containing a pellet. instapottery
  • Potter Julian Martinez, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New MexicoPhotographer: T. Harmon ParkhurstDate: 1925 - 1945? Palace of the Governors Photo Archive instapottery
  • Lucy Lewis ca. 1950 Acoma, NM. via Steve Naegele. Lucy Lewis is regarded as the matriarch of Acoma pottery and alongside Maria Martinez, is one of the best known Southwestern potters. She started making pottery around the turn of the century, continuing a tradition dating back hundreds, if not thousands of years. instapottery
  • Ewer made in Pesaro, Italy in the ca. 1490-1500.Tin-glazed earthenware, painted with colours. The form of this rare and unusual object is descendant of medieval metal aquamaniles; the handle is a figure of a woman who kneels to grasp the animal's head that forms the spout.The diamond ring encircling a zinnia painted on the front of the object was a device used by the Estense family, Dukes of Ferrara. instapottery