• A small bowl, crackled and bursting with a number of iron dots. A different shade of green compared to those I normally post and its due to the different clay body underneath. Instead of the red, almost pink you often see in the freshly thrown and finished vessels here, the clay body for this bowl is a dark grey. Its smooth and almost feels like plastic when throwing, a feeling I dont particularly like. When it comes to making again I plan on using this clay for many of my forms, although Ill be wedging in various grades of grog until it feels right.
  • Where bare clay meets glaze theres always conflict. I believe its one of the most important parts of a pot and whether glazed to an unwavering line like this, or left undulating or perhaps flowing past it, it must always be considered, even if glaze is splashed over on purpose, at least its a contemplated decision and cared about rather than forgotten.One of most poignant moments in my pottery career so far that made me realise it might be a profession Id like to continue was seeing my first ever bowl glazed like this, taken from the kiln with a perfect clean line of glaze. It looked so professional compared to everything I had made up until that point and it had come from my own hands, my diligence. That was almost eight years ago and there have been numerous moments like that since and Im sure itll continue, like all potters Ive spoken to they are still learning, even those whove been at it for fifty years.
  • A little thrown bowl, up close so you can see the iron blots that cover it, deeper yet are the thousands of minute bubbles that make up the glaze and the colour range and depth that comes about through the reduction firing and ever diverting crackles.Ive included a second picture that shows the underside too, the exposed ring of clay that protrudes from the glaze that makes up the foot-ring of this pot.This is a different clay from the usual one I use. It has more iron and noticeable little lumps of it too when throwing it. It reacts somewhat differently to glaze too, turning deeper shades of green and with a rim that melts into a much more metallic sheen. I never experimented much with it outside a few test vessels but I definitely want to throw a few batches of pieces with it come the time.
  • Thrown stoneware bowls with feldspathic glazes that contains various forms of iron oxide to determine their colour. The more iron they contain the brighter red the rims appear alongside the bodies of the vessels turning a deeper green hue.In oxidation these glazes turn yellow and the surfaces bubble as iron becomes refractory in an oxidised atmosphere as opposed to a flux, resulting in pots that look entirely different. The only instance it works is on a handful of the darker green glazes and even then it only looks pleasing when it happens to a single swarth of the pot as opposed to the whole vessel, which is rare, and a very welcome treat when opening the kiln.
  • 150,000 followers, a truly remarkable number and an amount I never dreamed of achieving simply through posting pictures of my ceramics and endless essays about pots. I cant thank everyone enough, to those who like, comment and purchase my work, supporting a livelihood I would have never thought possible. The new year will be exciting as I return to London and begin the search and setup of my own studio finally after years of learning and apprenticing. From one adventure in Japan to another back home and I can't wait to share it with you all. xPhotograph by Lizzie Mayson, (@lizziemayson).
  • Happy New Year from Japan! What a year, another without somehow missing a daily post with an accompanying written segment, its got to happen eventually right? Ive wrote a lot of emotive posts lately so Ill keep this short and sweet, thanks for making this such a wonderful year, to each and everyone of you who keep up with my posts, purchase my pots and pitch in with such lovely commentsyouve made a young mans dream a reality faster than he could have ever envisioned. Heres to you and heres to another extraordinary year. Love, Flo.x
  • A photograph of myself taken by Renaat of (to my amazement and almost total disbelief he and Ann-Sophie drove all the way from Belgium to attend a lecture I gave at Clay College Stoke ten days ago now about my career thus far and how Ive used Instagram to spur it on. I spoke about my time apprenticing with both Lisa Hammond and Ken Matsuzaki, about what I learnt, my observations and so on. Here Im throwing some yunomi teacups off the hump on a momentum wheel, it felt good getting back in the saddle and kicking away, albeit slightly comical in my impractical big black boots. I demonstrated a number of techniques I was taught whilst away but it wasnt the focus of the day.They werent the only ones who travelled far for it, so really this post is just to say thanks, not only to those who came, but for all the sustained kindness from you folk, from truly all over the planet, its remarkable and is still sometimes hard to believe.
  • What a nightthank you again everyone, the shop sold out so quickly, save one set of pots that are still there. I spent last night packing pots up and itll all be shipped out tomorrow hopefully.It really does mean the world to me, all the continued support these past few months and years even. Thank you so much, early night for me.x (Photograph by Lizzie Mayson.)
  • The underside of a small white crackle bowl with its bare clay foot-ring carefully finished and glazed as carefully as I can. We used a very thin wash of oribe glaze in Japan to coat the feet even, so they were entirely covered. Id like to try applying a very thin wash of my glaze over the bare clay and see if the same thing works, it requires everything being wadded and they might need a little clean up with a diamond drill but those few left I have from Japan look wonderful.Short post tonightits my night off.
  • Annual birthday evening offI cant believe its already been a year since the last post like this. All of your support these past twelve months has given me so much, following my graduation' from Maze Hill Pottery, my six months in Japan and even now during this hopefully short period of limbo between studios. Twenty-six journeys around the sun so far, thanks to each and every one of you youve followed me for these past four.x (photograph and garden by @kategadsby)
  • Ill keep this short and sweet. Thanks so much for everyone whose taken the time to follow my journey along this past year, through my time in Japan to the present day and the hopeful search and start of my studio in the coming months. Im itching to begin making again and I cant wait to share whats to come with you allthanks for being patient, kind and so supportive.x (Photograph by @lizziemayson)